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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
university economist said the numbers are concerning especially because the city cannot tax its way out without losing more residents and businesses. the report points out baltimore's property tax and income tax rates are the highest in the state. unfortunately, pension reform is the big elephant in the room, the economist said and the mayor has a terribly hard job ahead of her. >> the mayor will have to make cuts in decisions that will prove to be unpopular in the short run. >> while the mayor did not offer specific details, she did highlight four key themes for cuts including identifying strategies to a line recurring revenues, reducing property and income taxes, addressing infrastructure, and addressing the city's long-term liabilities. >> as far as specifically what cuts will be made, the mayor said she will discuss that in her state of the city address next week. if you'd like to take a closer look at the report, we provided a link to it on our website, wbaltv.com. we're live outside city hall tonight. wbal tv 11 news. >> we have several updates. the stabbing that happened a few bl
billion. it was $1.1 trillion last year. the c.b.o. attributed the decline in part to new tax hikes and to automatic spending cuts scheduled to take effect in march. but it said those same factors may also hold back economic growth. personal computer maker dell has announced it's going private. the company detailed a $24 billion buyout of stockholders today. it's the largest deal of its kind since the great recession. dell has been publicly traded for nearly 25 years. but sales have waned as consumers have shifted towards smartphones and tablets. britain took a major step today toward legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide. the house of commons voted more than 2-1 to legalize the practice. that's despite sharp divisions in the ruling conservative party. prime minister david cameron acknowledged the split, but supported the bill. >> i think it's delight gay people should be able to get married, too. this is yes about equality but it's also about making our society stronger. i know there are strong views on both sides of the aisle, i respect that, but i think this is an important ste
say the postal service, who takes no money now-- we get no tax money-- shouldn't get a tax bailout and should live within their means, meaning if twee need to eliminate delivery on saturday we do. now, our proposal is to eliminate delivery of mail but to continue to deliver packages, which includes medicine for the elderly and handicapped and the rural areas. and that's what our customers have told us. last year we made some changes. post offices. we talked about having to close small, nonprofitable postal offices. we spent a lot of time in the field and herd back from crust mers. they said we don't care if you shrink the opening, just keep the it open. here's the problem we're facing, jeff reerk no matter what anybody thinks on this-- people pay bills online. in the year 2003, we delivered 51 billion-- with a "b--" pieces of stamped mail out of the mailbox. this year it will be 21 billion. 30 billion pieces in less than 10 years at 46 cents apiece say differential in that group of $14 billion. nobody is stepping up saying i'll take a pay cut that makes those kinds of differences u
of a payroll tax holiday. 20 retailers tracked by thomson reuters reported an average sales gain of 5% in january. that's nearly twice as strong as last year. erika miller looks at whether the sales momentum can continue. >> reporter: if there's one thing helping retailers these days, it's cold weather. low temperatures in much of the nation has boosted sales of coats and warm clothing. so no surprise that department stores selling those items were big winners in january.
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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